Thong weed seaweed isle of Coll Scotland Mark Kirkland

Together we can fight for the ocean, and our future

2 minute read

Sandy Luk, CEO Marine Conservation Society

16 Nov 2021

Our CEO Sandy Luk explains why, despite the mixed results of the last two weeks, her resolve to fight for the ocean, and our future, has strengthened. And why she believes that together, we can make a difference.

Last week I emailed our supporters to ask for their support in calling on Prime Minster Boris Johnson and acting president for COP26, Alok Sharma MP, to listen to us, other organisations and scientists, to protect and restore the ocean – so that it can combat the growing climate crisis.

I was humbled by the response; hundreds joined me and took action. I have no doubt that their voices helped in making sure that climate action now includes ocean action.

I am sure that on Saturday evening, when the parties of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change finally agreed the Glasgow Climate Pact, you felt as angry and betrayed as I did by world leaders’ failure to deliver what the world demanded.

They haven’t delivered for the small island states whose very existence is in peril right now.

They haven’t delivered for indigenous people who play such an important role protecting our natural world. And they haven’t delivered for our young people, whose future depends on our actions today.

I am sure that on Saturday evening ... you felt as angry and betrayed as I did by world leaders’ failure to deliver what the world demanded.

Sandy Luk, CEO Marine Conservation Society

The ocean can now be a climate change super hero

However, the Glasgow Climate Pact does provide for ongoing action from now on, not just in four or five years’ time – action that we must continue to urgently demand from world leaders.  And it also recognises the crucial role that nature, and the ocean, play in tackling the escalating climate crisis, with ocean-based action now due to become part of climate action.

This is an extraordinary achievement for the organisations, and individuals, who fought so hard for the ocean to be recognised as a climate change superhero.

It is something I hoped for, but, just a month ago or so, really didn’t think could be achieved during this year’s COP.

Grey Seals in the surf Loch Eriboll Scotland Kirsty Andrews

The Glasgow Climate Pact recognised the role of the ocean in tackling the climate crisis

Credit: Kirsty Andrews

I know that like me you want more commitments, and stronger actions – not just from governments, but businesses too – to fight climate change, and to protect and restore the ocean so it can be a key ally in that fight.

And that is still possible. We’re not alone. There are many incredible people and organisations who are also putting pressure on those in power to act – and the Marine Conservation Society is proud to be working with them.

Our passion hasn’t faltered during that time, and despite the mixed results of the last two weeks my resolve has strengthened.

Sandy Luk, CEO, Marine Conservation Society

Which is why we’ve put together some questions for you to answer. If you have a few minutes I’d like to hear what you thought of the outcomes, and what you believe our priorities should be now.

We'll continue to fight for the ocean

The Marine Conservation Society has been campaigning for the ocean for over three decades. We fight for the ocean using people-powered action with science on our side.

Our passion hasn’t faltered during that time, and despite the mixed results of the last two weeks my resolve has strengthened. We will continue to fight for the ocean, and our future.

Thank you, I know that with your support we can continue to make a difference, together.

Support our call for urgent ocean action

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