We want you to say no to Red Rated seafood

Date posted: 16 December 2019

Plenty more fish in the sea? Maybe not! The way we catch and produce fish is damaging our seas. Fishing and fish farming are changing our oceans and we’re driving the demand for fish that are endangered or at risk. Some species are as endangered as the Bengal tiger, and we’re still taking them out of the sea.

Redrated

The health of the ocean is fundamental to life as we know it and we need to change how we fish, farm and purchase seafood in order to restore that health as quickly as we can.

Sam Stone,
Head of Fisheries and Aquaculture

In our Good Fish Guide, Red Rated fish are the least sustainable options as a result of overfishing, habitat damage or other unsustainable practices. Until they’re improved, we recommend avoiding these species, several of which are even endangered or critically endangered – like the European Eel – and without careful management could disappear forever.

In a new campaign, ‘Say No to Red Rated Fish’ we’re asking you to avoid eating red rated seafood, and to show your support for businesses and governments to do more to remove unsustainable fish from sale and to address the underlying causes of red rated seafood. Click here to see which fish are Red Rated.

Samuel Stone, Head of Fisheries and Aquaculture at MCS says: “The health of the ocean is fundamental to life as we know it and we need to change how we fish, farm and purchase seafood in order to restore that health as quickly as we can. We are losing biodiversity and our marine resources are under multiple threats, but improving the way we fish and farm seafood can really help to turn this around.”

New resources launched with this campaign outline some of the key issues associated with red rated seafood in both the fishing and fish farming sectors, as well ways to address these issues and tips for making the most responsible seafood choices. When dining out or shopping for groceries, we want you to check not only what fish you’re getting, but also to look at how it’s caught and where from and the use the Good Fish Guide to make better choices. Making these small changes will help to ensure we have a healthy, diverse and thriving ocean forever.”

Stone says “We all need to be aware that our actions, both big and small, are affecting the health of our ocean. Saying no to red rated seafood will help to reduce demand for the least sustainable options and will encourage decision makers to take action. Businesses that sell seafood can have a huge influence by specifying and supporting improvements in fishing and farming practices, and governments need to develop better laws to manage our seas and invest more funding into fisheries and aquaculture management.”

We’re working hard to make seafood more sustainable by campaigning for better fisheries and aquaculture management and Marine Protected Areas; identifying the best and worst seafood choices in our Good Fish Guide ratings and encouraging businesses to make responsible seafood choices. But we need your help too!

We need you to join us and pledge to ‘Say No to Red Rated’ so that we can show businesses and governments that you want to see urgent action to address the causes of red rated seafood to ensure we have a thriving ocean forever.

Actions you can take