How old holiday snaps can throw light on Wales’ changing coastline

Date posted: 6 April 2018

People are being asked to sort through their old holiday snaps of parts of North East Wales to help GCSE and A-level geography students learn about how the environment has changed, and how it could be protected in the future.

North Wales Dunes
© El Bindle

North east Wales has a fabulous coastline, which we all love to visit but there’s no doubt it’s changed over time. Because these changes can take place quite slowly, a photograph is often the best way to identify the differences.

Gill Bell,
MCS Head of Conservation, Wales

Shifting sands due to coastal erosion, climate change and tourism mean the dunes and beaches of North East Wales are always changing, impacting the landscape, community and economy, Natural Resources Wales (NRW) said.

NRW is asking holidaymakers and local people to share pictures and memories of Talacre in Flintshire and Gronant in Denbighshire, the last intact dune system on the North Wales coast.

The area is important for wildlife, including natterjack toads and little terns, as well as for the local community and economy.

Gill Bell, MCS Head of Conservation Wales, says this is a great innovative idea that will keep the history of the area alive: “North East Wales has a fabulous coastline, which we all love to visit but there’s no doubt it’s changed over time. Because these changes can take place quite slowly, a photograph is often the best way to identify the differences.”

“Talking to older people who may have lived in the area for many years is also a great way for students to find out about the area’s past, to hear it brought to life and see how the landscape has changed, and how we can improve it as part of the Resilient Wales goal.”

The photographs and memories will help NRW develop educational resources for students.

Ffion Hughes, education coordinator at NRW, said: “Our coastline in Wales is spectacular, it is home to a variety of wildlife and it provides us with special places to visit and enjoy.

“But, like all coastlines, it is constantly changing, and it’s important that we understand how these changes happen and their effect.

“We’re asking holidaymakers and local people to send us their pictures and memories of Talacre and Gronant, so students can investigate how the area has changed over time.

“Studying the area, looking at pictures and listening to stories, will provide them with valuable, real-life examples of the pressures facing our coastline which could even help protect it for the future.”

Anyone with photos and stories about the area can submit them by Monday 7th May 2018.

By Email: education@naturalresourceswales.gov.uk

Or by post:
Freepost
RSAY-KLUZ-HJBC,
Natural Resources Wales,
Clawddnewydd,
Ruthin,
LL15 2NL

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