Moon jellyfish blooming in numbers forced the nuclear power station in Torness to close

Richard Harrington By: Richard Harrington
Date posted: 4 July 2011

Moon jellyfish blooming in numbers forced the nuclear power station in Torness to close An enormous bloom of moon jellyfish has clogged up the sea around theTorness nuclear power station on the East Lothian coast.

Moon jellyfish blooming in numbers forced the nuclear power station in Torness to close An enormous bloom of moon jellyfish has clogged up the sea around theTorness nuclear power station on the East Lothian coast. The jellyfish were so abundant in the water that the power plant operators, EDF, took the decision to stop production in both reactors as the water, used to cool the plant had become clogged with jellyfish at the intake filters. Local fishermen, more used to netting prawns, were called in to catch the jellyfish to ensure production could return to normal as soon as possible. Moon jellyfish had been reported to MCS in the area a few days before, but not in numbers that forced the plant closure. These jellyfish only tend to live for one season, feeding on plankton and digesting their catch within the cavity of the bell. Jellyfish, in common with other plankton, vertically migrate and leatherback turtles haved been recorded diving up to 1,300m exploring for jellyfish who then return to the surface, where the turtles tend to feed on them after dark. If you see jellyfish, whether in numbers or individually, then please let us know by clicking here

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