Ocean optimism at London Fashion Week

Erin O'Neill By: Erin O'Neill
Date posted: 18 February 2019

Fashion and multimedia designers VIN + OMI have debuted their eco-fashion show ‘Planet Rewind’ at London Fashion Week. Bags and belts from the collection and proceeds made from their sale are being donated to MCS in a fish meets fashion collaboration.

VIN AND OMI
© Ocean Outdoor

Jodie Kidd and Jo Wood both spoke to us about our work and showed great enthusiasm for keeping our ocean healthy, pollution free and protected.

Erin O’Neill,
Digital Editor
Marine Conservation Society

The event was held in the heart of East London at the Andaz Hotel, Liverpool Street and themed around sustainable and environmentally friendly fashion.

Accessories from the show, including bags in the shape of fish, were made from recycled vinyl in collaboration with advertising pioneers and ocean lovers Ocean Outdoor. Bags and belts from the collection and proceeds made from their sale will be donated to MCS, to further fund our work to create a healthier future for our ocean.

The show saw the return of supermodel Jodie Kidd to the catwalk after a break of 10 years. Kidd is passionate about our seas, having spoken out in the past on the ocean plastic crisis. Jo and Leah Wood, ex-wife and daughter of Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood and now environmental activists and rock and roll eco-pioneers, also walked the runway.

Erin O’Neill, MCS Digital Editor attended the event: “Jodie Kidd and Jo Wood both spoke to us about our work and showed great enthusiasm for keeping our ocean healthy, pollution free and protected. They also recorded a short message showing just how strongly they feel about the issue of ocean pollution.”

The materials from the collection came as a result of VIN + OMI working with 22 clean-up projects who collected plastic from all around the UK, including from the River Ouse, Thames, and Severn. Oxford Brookes University students also collected plastic from parks in Oxford. The plastic was converted into VIN + OMI’s rPET fabric which was used to create the pieces in the collection.

The show was full of sustainable touches, including metallic flower accessories made with recycled metal cans, and shoes destined for landfill that were upcycled and worn on the runway.

Erin says it’s undeniable that the fashion industry has a huge impact on the environment: “Clothes production uses toxic chemicals and washing them releases tiny particles of plastic that end up in the ocean. Putting the emphasis on recycling, and reducing so-called, ‘fast fashion’, is one of the best ways that fashion designers and big brands can help to reduce these negative environmental effects.”

In partnership with Ocean Outdoor, highlights of the show will be featured UK wide across Ocean Outdoor’s The Grid network and on the Piccadilly Lights, London on Tuesday February 19.

Actions you can take