Rosemary Bank Seamount NCMPA

Status: Designated

Description

Site overview

This site is in the deep waters off western Scotland, north-east of the Rockall Trough. It is actually an extinct volcano which towers over 1,000 meters above the seafloor, and is one of only three seamounts present in Scotland’s seas. This is a hotspot for marine life and significant to the health of Scotland’s seas because of the way it influences underwater currents that bring valuable nutrients to the region. It is a nursery and feeding area for several types of fish such orange roughy and blue ling. Deep-sea sponge aggregations and cold water corals are also found here. In fact around 88 million sponges may be present in the area and they are in largely a pristine condition. The occasional sperm and pilot whale also swims through. 

MPA Type

Nature Conservation Marine Protected Area

Nature Conservation Marine Protected Areas (NCMPAs) are designated under UK legislation (Marine Scotland Act 2010) and have been established around Scotland to contribute to the UK MPA network by protecting a range of important habitats, species and features of the seabed.

Designation date

24 July 2014

Surface Area

6,934.90 km2 (2,677.58 mi.2)

Perimeter

312.71 km (194.31 mi.)

  • Deep-sea sponge aggregations

    Deep sea areas dominated mainly by two types of sponge - glass sponge and giant sponge.

  • Seamount communities

    The biological communities found on the large geological structures that are seamounts. These include a range of animals from fragile corals and sponges through to polychaete worms and sea stars that may live in association with sediments on and around se

  • Seamount

    A large-scale undersea topographic feature that rises steeply several hundred meters from the surrounding deep-ocean floor.

  • Rosemary Bank Seamount

    A large-scale undersea topographic feature that rises steeply several hundred meters from the surrounding deep-ocean floor.

Did you know?…

To the shelf limits, Scotland has 61% of UK waters, of which 23% are now in existing or new ‘marine protected areas’

Over 500,000 records on undersea habitats and species have been collected by volunteer Seasearch divers providing significant evidence for inshore ‘marine protected areas’

An area over 9 times the size of Wales is now in marine protected areas in the UK, but less than 1% is considered by MCS scientists to be well managed

The future of fisheries is being decided

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