Lobster, Norway, Langoustine, Dublin Bay prawn or scampi

Nephrops norvegicus

Method of production — Caught at sea
Capture method — Demersal otter trawl
Capture area — North East Atlantic (FAO 27)
Stock area — Celtic Sea and West of Scotland
Stock detail — Celtic Sea, the Smalls (Management Area M, FU 22)

Sustainability rating three info

Sustainability overview

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Biology

Norway Lobster (also known as langoustine or scampi) live in burrows on the seabed. They are limited to a muddy habitat and require sediment with a silt and clay content to excavate burrows. Their distribution therefore is determined by the availability of suitable habitat. They occur over a wide area in the North East Atlantic, from Iceland to North Africa and into the Mediterranean, and constitute a valuable fishery for many countries. Males grow relatively quickly to around 6 cm, but seldom exceed 10 years old. Females grow more slowly and can reach 20 years old. Females mature at about 3 years. In the autumn they lay eggs which remain attached to the tail for 9 months (known as being "berried"). During this time the berried females rarely emerge from their burrows and therefore do not commonly appear in trawl catches, although they may be caught using baited creels. This habit of remaining in their burrows has probably afforded their populations some resilience to fishing pressure. Egg hatching occurs in the spring, and females emerge in spring/summer to moult and mate.

Stock information

Stock Area

Celtic Sea and West of Scotland

Stock information

Nephrops stock assessment and management is based on a system of management units (A-R), which broadly coincide with ICES areas, and functional units (FU)(1-33), which cover the distribution of the species, particularly in relation to suitable habitat types. In part due to the difficulty of assessing stocks, which may spend significant amounts of time in burrows, a fishery independent survey method using video surveys has been developed, which uses burrow density to estimate stock biomass. This technique is now widely, though not comprehensively, used within the management units, enabling recommended TACs and management advice to be provided by ICES. Fisheries landings data are also available to augment the video survey data.
The historical harvest rates, calculated as (landings + dead discards)/(abundance estimate), have decreased since 2007 and have been below FMSY since 2011. The stock abundance has declined below MSY Btrigger in 2016.
ICES advises that when the MSY approach is applied, and assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2013-2015, catches in 2017 should be no more than 2063 tonnes. This implies landings of no more than 1807 tonnes.

Management

A single TAC covers the entire ICES Subarea 7. To ensure that the stock in functional unit (FU) 22 is exploited sustainably, management should be implemented at thefunctional unit level.

Capture Information

Almost 100% of landings are from trawl fisheries.

References

ICES Advice 2016, Book 5 http://www.ices.dk/sites/pub/Publication%20Reports/Advice/2016/2016/nep-22.pdf