Skate, Norwegian or Black

Dipturus nidarosiensis

Method of production — Caught at sea
Capture method — All applicable methods
Capture area — North East Atlantic (FAO 27)
Stock area — All Areas
Stock detail

4, 3a, 7d


Picture of Skate, Norwegian or Black

Sustainability rating five info

Sustainability overview

Red-Rated Species. The Norwegian skate is a Prohibited Species. There is insufficient data to manage the species appropriately. Therefore, it is automatically red-rated. Norwegian skate are caught in a mixture of fishing gears, mainly otter trawls but also in nets. They have been popular with sea anglers. Norwegian skate can be caught as bycatch.

Biology

Norwegian skates belong to the Rajidae family which includes skates and rays. The Norwegian skate is a large shelf and slope species, growing to a maximum length of 200cm. Size and age at maturity and maximum age is unknown. It is endemic to the northeast Atlantic, found off Norway, southern Iceland, around Rockall Trough.

Stock information

Criterion score: 1 info

Stock Area

All Areas

Stock information

The Norwegian skate is a Prohibited Species. It is a deep-water species and its stock status is uncertain.

Little information is generally available on the landings of deep-water skates: catches of Norwegian Skates are generally recorded as generic skates. Norwegian skates is one of the largest skates and have a really low productivity but also a high catchability. The new IUCN report shows that the population is still near threatened with declining populations. There is insufficient data to manage the species appropriately.

Due to its poor stock status, it is automatically red-rated.

Management

Criterion score: 1 info

This species is prohibited under EU law, banning the fishing for, retaining, transhipping and landing Norwegian skate. This is the highest protection possible under the EUs Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) and is a long-term conservation strategy aimed at very depleted and vulnerable species.

Capture Information

Criterion score: 1 info

Norwegian skate are caught in a mixture of fishing gears, mainly otter trawls but also in nets. They have been popular with sea anglers. Norwegian skate is caught as bycatch, but by law, when they are caught, they must be released quickly with the least harm as possible. When captured with tangle nets, skate condition was significantly better during shorter (17-28 hours) soak times, compared with (42-48 h soak time)(Ellis et al. 2018). Under current EU legislation it is prohibited to fish for, retain on board, tranship or land Norwegian skate.

Alternatives

Based on method of production, fish type, and consumer rating: only fish rated 2 and below are included as an alternative in the list below. Click on a name to show the sustainable options available.

Dab
Halibut, Atlantic (Farmed)
Halibut, Pacific
Megrim
Plaice
Sole, Dover sole, Common sole
Sole, Lemon
Turbot (Caught at sea)
Turbot (Farmed)

References

Stehmann, M.F.W., Ellis, J., Walls, R. & Lynghammar, A. 2015. Dipturus nidarosiensis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2015: e.T161729A48927468. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015-1.RLTS.T161729A48927468.en

ICES 2017. Other rays and skates (Rajidae) in Subarea 4 and in divisions 3.a and 7.d (North Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat, and eastern English Channel). Published 6 October 2017 raj.27.3a47d DOI: 10.17895/ices.pub.3169. Available at: http://ices.dk/sites/pub/Publication%20Reports/Advice/2017/2017/raj.27.3a47d.pdf

https://www.sharktrust.org/shared/downloads/factsheets/black_skate_st_factsheet.pdf

Ellis, J. R., Burt, G.J., Grilli, G., McCully Phillips, S.R., Catchpole, T.L., Maxwell, D.L. 2018. At-vessel mortality of skates (Rajidae) taken in coastal fisheries and evidence of longer-term survival. Journal of Fish Biology. 92, 1702-1719. doi:10.1111/jfb.13597

Mangi, S., Kupschus, S., Mackinson, S., Rodmell, D., Lee, A., Bourke, E., Rossiter, T., Masters, J., Hetherington, S., Catchpole, T. and Righton, D. 2018. Progress in designing and delivering effective fishing industry science data collection in the UK. Fish 00:1-21. https://doi.org/10.1111/faf.12279